Several years ago we had our own beehives. One of the byproducts of having your own bees, besides honey is beeswax.

Beeswax from our bees.

Beeswax from our bees.

There are many uses for beeswax including lip balm, sore muscle salve and wood butter. I love to make beeswax candles with the wax. Not only are they a beautiful color but they burn cleaner than paraffin candles and they burn slower and are usually dripless.

Beeswax candles

Beeswax candles

Poured beeswax candles are made from melted beeswax that is reshaped in a mold.

Antique Candle Mold

Antique Candle Mold

Melt your beeswax in a double boiler. Never melt over direct heat. Melt approximately 2-3 pounds depending on the size of your mold. Do not allow wax to boil. Do not heat over 180 degrees.  You can use an old coffee can set in a pan of water to melt the wax or a container designed for melting wax with a handle. Beeswax is flammable so use caution.

Use caution when melting beeswax.

Use caution when melting beeswax.

While the wax is melting set up your mold.  We use an antique mold given to us by my mother in law. Spray the inside of the mold with a silicon spray as this helps the finished candles to be released from the mold. Cut lengths of wick the length of each tube plus 3-4 inches. Thread the wick through the hole in the bottom of the mold. Tie a small knot to keep the wick from slipping though, and then use putty to fill in any gaps.

Knots in the bottom of the mold.

Knots in the bottom of the mold.

You don’t want the wax pouring though the bottom of the mold. Tie the wick at the top as well to keep it in place. We use a piece of wire coat hanger to hold all the wicks in place.

Wicks securely fastened in place.

Wicks securely fastened in place.

You can also wet a sponge cut to size and dip in ice water, place the mold on top of the sponge.

Once the wax is melted carefully pour the wax into the mold.

Carefully pour the melted wax into the mold.

Carefully pour the melted wax into the mold.

Pour slowly to avoid any air bubbles from forming. As the wax hardens it will contract, this will cause indentions in the base of the candle. You can pour more hot wax into the base after it has begun to get hard to level out the base.

You may have to add more melted wax to level out the base.

You may have to add more melted wax to level out the base.

Let the beeswax cool and harden. I usually leave them overnight.

When completely cooled, cut the knots and remove the putty. Carefully remove the candles from the molds Trim the wick on the top of each candle to about ½ inch. If you have trouble removing the candles from the mold place the mold in your freezer for a short period.

Homemade Beeswax Candles

Homemade Beeswax Candles

Homemade candles make wonderful gifts.

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4 comments on “Frugal Tips: Making Beeswax Candles

Tilli Walker on November 21, 2015 10:36 pm

I have a problem for which nobody seems to have a solution. My taper candles come out of the mold with a rough depression in the side. I never used to have this problem. I am using a new batch of beeswax. Would there be water in the wax yet? I use canola spray to treat mold. I am anxious to figure this out.

Nancy Wolff on November 23, 2015 1:55 am

Tilli,
It sounds like an issue with your mold? I’ve never heard of having a rough depression on just one side. Have you tried a second batch? Did you have the same result?

Lady Locust on December 10, 2015 2:21 pm

Those are beautiful candles. I did some dipped (beeswax of course) and love them also. That mold is so cool.

Nancy Wolff on December 10, 2015 3:19 pm

Lady Locust,
We have fun with our antique candle mold!

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