Tag Archives: Gardening

For some reason I have the perfect conditions to grow an aloe plant. The Aloe Vera plant is a popular houseplant with medicinal properties. The sap from the leaves has wonderful topical benefits, especially on burns and sunburns. I think I first started growing aloe plants when we lived in Florida over twenty years ago! These plants are an ideal addition to your home, and they are very easy to care for. In fact not only are they easy to care for, but propagating an aloe plant is also extremely easy.Propagating an Aloe Plant

 

My plant does so well that I find myself passing along baby plants to my friends. You might wonder how I do this. While you can actually grow an aloe plant from a leaf cutting it is much easier and more successful to propagate from offsets or “pups” .Propagating an Aloe Plant

 

Aloe vera is a succulent and as such, is related to the cactus. Cacti are fairly easy to propagate from cuttings, but aloe vera cuttings, with their high moisture content, rarely become viable plants. Rooting an aloe vera plant leaf seems like it should work, but all you will get is a rotten or shriveled leaf.

 

It is much easier to share this wonderful plant by removal of offsets. This is a simple process that anyone can easily do. If you look carefully at your aloe plant you will notice little aloe plants (offsets) forming off the mother plant. As a general rule the offset should be about 1/5 the size of the parent plant and should have several sets of true leaves.Propagating an Aloe Plant

 

When the offset is large enough remove the dirt from around the base. When you remove the offset you want to make sure it has a complete root system attached.Propagating an Aloe Plant

 

Plant the newly removed offset in a dry cacti-potting mix or make your own with one part potting soil and one part sand. Allow it to sit for one week and then water the soil. After this you would care for the aloe vera pup the same way you would the mother plant.Propagating an Aloe Plant

 

To successfully grown an aloe vera plant remember that the plant is a succulent and does well in a dry environment. They should be planted in a cactus potting soil mix and should have plenty of drainage. They do not like standing water. They also need bright light and do best in south or west facing windows.

 

Now you can not only grow your aloe plant successfully but you now know that propagating an aloe plant is easy and you can pass the aloe plant pups off to your friends!Propagating an Aloe Plant

Welcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hostscohost-photos1

Tracy at Our Simple HomesteadFacebookTwitterPinterest

Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram

Delci at Heritage Club StablesFacebookGoogle+PinterestYouTube

Sandra at Clearwater Farm – FacebookPinterestInstagram

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop was:
Live Like Your Grandmother Did

My Favorite Post:
Make Your Own Unpaper Towels

 

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.



Nancy On The Home Front

 

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.


Let’s start hopping!


Propagating a Christmas CactusDid you read my post on moving houseplants? If so you know that I can’t move all of my large plants with me. Instead I plan to propagate my Christmas cactus and have a much smaller pot to take with me. Propagating a Christmas cactus is very easy. This plant makes a great holiday gift for friends and family, so knowing how to propagate and grow Christmas cactus can give you extra plants to share with your friends!Propagating a Christmas Cactus

 

The first step is to simply take a short, y-shaped cutting from the stem top. The cutting should consist of at least two or three joined segments. Make sure all the cuttings are from healthy foliage.Propagating a Christmas Cactus

Allow the cutting to dry a few hours before potting it up for rooting, this will help to avoid any potential stem rot from excessive moisture.Propagating a Christmas Cactus

 

Once the cutting has dried for a couple of hours place the segment in a most peat and sand soil mix. Insert the segment about a quarter of its length below the soil surface. Place the pot in a well lit area, avoiding direct sunlight.Propagating a Christmas Cactus

 

Water the cutting sparingly at first to prevent rot. After two or three weeks the Christmas cactus cutting should begin to show signs of growth at the tips of its leaves. Once the cutting has rooted, it can be transplanted into a pot with loose potting soil. The cutting may wilt a little, which is normal and will eventually subside.Propagating a Christmas Cactus

 

Propagating a Christmas cactus is easy and can be very rewarding. Now you will have an inexpensive gift to give others during the holidays! My cutting is from a very large plant that belonged to my husband’s grandmother! I think everyone in the family has a plant started from cuttings! I’m happy to now have a smaller plant to move with us to our new home.

Simple Homestead Blog HopWelcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hostscohost-photos1

Tracy at Our Simple HomesteadFacebookTwitterPinterest

Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram

Delci at Heritage Club StablesFacebookGoogle+PinterestYouTube

Sandra at Clearwater Farm – FacebookPinterestInstagram

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop was:
From Trailer To Cabin, a Cinderella Storyhomecabin2

My Favorite Post:
What is a Deep Pantry / Food Storage, and Do You Have One?food_pantry_full

 

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.



Nancy On The Home Front

 

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.


Let’s start hopping!


simplehomesteadWelcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hostscohost-photos1

Tracy at Our Simple HomesteadFacebookTwitterPinterest

Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram

Delci at Heritage Club StablesFacebookGoogle+PinterestYouTube

Sandra at Clearwater Farm – FacebookPinterestInstagram

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop was:
Frugal Living and Self Sufficiency Skillsblog hop

My Favorite Post:
50 Ways You Can Save Money This Week50-ways-to-save-money

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.



Nancy On The Home Front

 

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.


Let’s start hopping!


simplehomesteadWelcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hostscohost-photos1

Tracy at Our Simple HomesteadFacebookTwitterPinterest

Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram

Delci at Heritage Club StablesFacebookGoogle+PinterestYouTube

Sandra at Clearwater Farm – FacebookPinterestInstagram

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop was:
Poverty in the 18oo’sbirthplace of D L Moody 1837

My Favorite Post:
Our Farmhouse Renovationimage-54

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.



Nancy On The Home Front

 

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.


Let’s start hopping!

Hop code #87


Never Miss a Post!

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Find Me

FACEBOOK
TWITTER
Pinterest
RSS

Nancy’s Archives

Linked to some of my favorite link parties!

Nancy On The Home Front