Category Archives: Home Front

Last weekend we had a houseful of company and we really wanted to go hiking. The weather was good but it was also the start of hunting season. In fact the first weekend in November is Youth Hunting Season. We wondered if it was safe to go hiking during hunting season or was hunting even allowed on the Appalachian Trail?hiking during hunting season

 

Hunting is allowed on all Green Mountain Club owned and managed lands, including the Long Trail and Appalachian Trail corridors in Vermont. Hunting is prohibited along approximately 900 miles of the Appalachian Trail through national forest lands, nationals recreation areas and on state lands and game lands. Hikers should be aware that the protected corridor is often narrow, averaging about 1000 feet wide. Even in areas where hunting is prohibited, hunters on adjacent lands may not know that they are near the trail. Hunters may inadvertently cross onto Trail lands or unknowingly fire toward the Trail. If you are planning to hike during hunting season it is important to be safe and be respectful of all trail users.hiking during hunting season

 

Before you go hiking be aware of the specific dates for hunting seasons.

 

Hunters often hunt during the early dawn and dusk hours. This is also when visibility is low. Plan your hike during the middle of the day.

 

Wear blaze orange clothing, which is visible from both the front and the back. Avoid wearing brown or white clothing, the colors of a deer. If you are hiking with a dog make sure your furry friend is wearing a bright bandana or a blaze orange vest.hiking during hunting season

 

You can avoid areas where hunting is legal during deer firearm season, which varies by state, but typically occurs during parts of the months of October, November, December, and January. During those months, you may want to hike in one of the five national parks crossed by the A.T

 

By taking a few precautions you can enjoy a wonderful hike. Be aware of your surroundings and be careful when hiking in valleys and near roads and trailheads.hiking during hunting season

 

We enjoyed a beautiful hike on Saturday; the only people we saw were a few other hikers. We all were wearing bright colors and did a lot of talking along the hike, which helped make our presence known to any hunters in the area.hiking during hunting season

 

If you are planning to hike during hunting season take these simple precautions and enjoy your time in the woods.hiking during hunting season

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These tortilla pizzas are a little different from your traditional pizza but every time I make them they disappear before my eyes! We have eaten them as a dinner paired with a salad but they would also be delicious served as a snack or an appetizer. The spread keeps well in the refrigerator so it’s so easy to whip up these tortilla pizzas for a snack for an appetizer for unexpected company. I’m also thinking the spread would be good with a little crabmeat added. Going to have to try that!tortilla pizzas

 

The total time is about 30 minutes and the recipe as written feeds about eight, unless you are serving it as a dinner in which case I would say it feeds four. I used whole-wheat tortillas slightly larger than the 7-inch flour tortillas. I’m sure you could also use corn tortillas for a slight variation. I’m sure no matter what type of tortillas you use for these tortilla pizzas you will be amazed at how delicious they are.

Tortilla Pizza

 

Ingredients:

 

¾ cup mayonnaise

½ cup Parmesan cheese

½ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

½ cup red onion, minced

¼ cup minced green pepper

¼ cup minced red pepper

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 tsp. dried basil

¼ tsp. Salt

1/8 tsp. Pepper

4 flour tortillas (7 inches)

 

Directions:

 

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.tortilla pizzas

 

In a large bowl combine all the ingredients except the tortillas. Place the tortillas on a greased baking sheet or on a pizza pan. Spread the cheese mixture evenly on the tortillas, you don’t want to spread it very thick just enough to coat the surface.

 

Bake at 400 degrees for 8-10 minutes or until golden. The cheese mixture will puff up slightly.tortilla pizzas Cut into wedges and serve.tortilla pizzas They are best eaten as soon as they are cooked.tortilla pizzas The leftover spread can be saved for another day.

Welcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hosts

Kathi at Oak Hill HomesteadFacebookPinterestInstagram Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram Sandra at Clearwater Farm – Facebook – Pinterest – Instagram Leah at Busy Gals Homestead and Leah’s Lovely LopsFacebook PinterestTwitter Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop:
4 Things to Learn from the Amish About Staying Healthy 

My Favorite Post:
A Roundup of Pumpkin Recipes

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.

 

Nancy On The Home Front

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.

Let’s start hopping!


Welcome to the Simple Homestead Blog Hop!

We are so glad that you have stopped by for a visit! We encourage you to look through some of the great posts shared by our readers and then take the time to read those that interest you. If you are adding to our list, thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us. It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings. We hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us.

Meet Our Great Co-hosts

Kathi at Oak Hill HomesteadFacebookPinterestInstagram Dash at Bloom Where You’re PlantedFacebookInstagram Sandra at Clearwater Farm – Facebook – Pinterest – Instagram Leah at Busy Gals Homestead and Leah’s Lovely LopsFacebook PinterestTwitter Nancy at On the HomefrontFacebookTwitterPinterest

Featured Posts

Each week we’ll feature the most-viewed post from last week’s hop. Each host also features her own picks from the posts linked the previous week. Visit each of our blogs to see if you were featured this week.

Our most-visited post from last week’s hop:
How To Clean Your Oven Window

My Favorite Post:
How To Make Dried Butternut Squash Dog Treats

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week.

If you were featured be sure to pick up your Simple Homestead blog hop button below. Just highlight the text in the box and paste into your blog sidebar; the button will show up automatically.

 

Nancy On The Home Front

The Rules

You are invited to share your original homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts. We have a few little rules:

  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here.
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted.

Let’s start hopping!


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Why-gardening-is-good-for-youAs you know, here at Nancy On The Home Front, I love to share with you all kinds of tips, tricks, ideas and insight into how you can live a cleaner and healthier life. As a 30 year plus gardener, I have a lot of experience in not just how to tend to a garden, but also in knowing how good it is for your wellbeing. I have teamed up with the good people at What Shed to share with you these interesting facts about why gardening is so good for you.

 

As you look at the information, you will see right away that gardening is not just a fun hobby that is going to result in you having some of your own homegrown food to have fun with. It is going to get you up and moving, making you active is the first step to having a more healthy and productive life and the stats back this up as people who garden tend to have 27 percent lower chance of having a heart attack! It is not just physical benefits either. Gardening is also proven to be great for your mental wellbeing as well.

 

Gardening works as a wonderful way to release stress and make you happy and let’s face it we should all be doing more of what makes us happy. Also, those who regularly tend to their garden tend to stay sharper and give their brain more chance in fighting off the effects of aging!

 

So next time someone comes to your house and sees you covered in mud, walking with a handful of carrots and a big smile on your face. Let them know how important gardening is for you and how it makes you feel like a million bucks. Plus let’s not forget the fantastic satisfaction of making a dish with food you have grown with your own two hand.

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Us Americans, while having many admirable qualities about us, tend to take up a lot of resources to sustain, and we make a ton of garbage, while we’re at it. As a matter of fact, Americans produce well over 250 million tons of garbage every year. This means every person is trashing over 4 pounds every day. That’s a lot of trash. It doesn’t have to be this way, though. If we all were even just a little bit more conscious about how much waste we generate, and put just a little more effort into being less…trashy…then we could save millions and millions of waste every year. Here are some quick ways that you can reduce waste in your own home, and be more sustainable, in general…

 

Make your recycling more accessible than your trash can

 

The absolute easiest thing that you can do to create less garbage in your home is make it a little harder to get to the garbage can. We tend to be creatures of convenience in this country. It’s just how we operate. For this reason, making it a little less convenient to get to the garbage can, while a little more convenient to get to the recycling bin, is going to inspire us to do a whole lot more recycling, and a lot less mindlessly throwing things in the trash without thinking about it.

 

Revamp your water appliances

 

Did you know that a leaking faucet that drips one drop of water every second will waste almost 2700 gallons of water in a single year? That’s an astonishing amount, especially when California seems to be dying of thirst every other year. The issue with water waste is that it is so easy to just let it slide by. It’s incredibly easy to just ignore a leaky faucet that isn’t doing any major, at the moment. This is true of all your water appliances. An old toilet is usually wasting about 4 gallons of water, every time it flushes, and yet that amount could be reduced just by changing a few things about how the toilet operates. Taking a look at all of your water appliances and looking into how they can use less water may seem like a hassle, but it goes a long way. Checking up on your plumbing also reduces the risks of flooding!

 

Be conscious of how much energy your home uses

 

Being sustainable and trash-conscious isn’t just something you can do to make yourself feel good; it can also make your wallet a little fatter! Heating, air conditioning, and other energy costs can drain hundreds of dollars out of our account every month. If you’re like many homeowners in America, you are probably spending more than you need to on energy costs. Everyone thinks they need to fork out for solar panels to prevent this, or some other science fiction advancements, but you can reduce these costs with some simple solutions, such as window placement and knowing when to turn your heating/AC on and off. Oh, and turning things off when you aren’t using them goes a long way.

 

Make a compost pile

 

It’s inevitable that you are going to have a lot of food and paper waste in your home. Making meals means having scraps of food that aren’t going to end up on people’s plates, whether that be potato peels or apple cores. However, you can make the most of your food scraps and extra newspaper by shredding everything up and creating a compost pile. Compost piles help provide nutrients that can be useful to gardens and trees, and can help your yard look greener than it ever has.

 

Buy bulk items in reusable containers

 

When you are hitting the grocery store, almost everything you are purchasing is coming in its own package that took a tremendous amount of energy to produce, yet only holds a little bit of product. Don’t fall into this trash trap. Instead, you can reduce waste and save some money by buying most kitchen staples in bulk in containers that can be reusable, such as jars. Also, purchasing reusable grocery bags that you take to the store, rather than plastic grocery bags, goes a long way towards helping the environment, as well.

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