Author Archives: Nancy Wolff

Often I speak about saving money, but today I want to talk about saving lettuce seeds! In June we went away for two weeks. My garden had all been planted and I had some wonderful Butter Crunch lettuce that was coming along nicely. It just wasn’t ready to pick yet.

When we got home the lettuce had bolted.Bolting lettuce Rather than pick it and feed it to the chickens I decided to let it go to seed and collect the seeds. Because the plants were isolated and I didn’t have any other lettuce going to seed I didn’t worry about cross-pollination. Lettuce is an inbreeding plant. Lettuce flowers form in heads of 10-25 individual florets. Each floret is one celled and produces one seed. Lettuce seeds ripen irregularly and are ready for harvest from 12-24 days after flowering. The easiest way to collect the most seeds is to shake the seed heads daily into a large grocery bag that is then stored in a dry area.

Seed head in paper bag

Seed head in paper bag

More than half of the seed volume will be white lettuce feathers and chaff.

Tiny lettuce seeds among the chaff.

Tiny lettuce seeds among the chaff.

It is best to use a fine mesh screen to separate the seeds.

Lettuce seeds will remain viable for three years when stored in a cool, dry, dark location. I have a bunch of little envelopes that are perfect for storing seeds. Be sure to label your seeds!

Storing lettuce seeds

Storing lettuce seeds

Hopefully next year I will plant these lettuce seeds and enjoy a nice harvest!greens, garden

If you are interested in learning how to save seeds one of the best books around is Seed to Seed by Suzanne Ashworth.

Be inspired to garden year round or save your seeds.

Be inspired to garden year round or save your seeds.

Linked to many of my favorite blog hops (see link in sidebar) also linked to:
”Wildcrafting

Watching our parents get older is a surreal experience, especially if you can see them no longer able to take care of themselves or approaching what will be the end of their lives. As uncomfortable and unwelcome as this part of life is, there are some serious matters to take into consideration to make this part of their life not only better for them, but for you as well. Here are some things to take into consideration if you have aging parents.

512397

512397

1. Signs of a Stroke or Heart Attack: The elderly can be at higher risk for stroke or heart attack. Here are some signs you can recognize and call for help as soon as possible:

○ Uncomfortable pressure, pain or squeezing in the center of the chest.

○ Shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness or breaking out in cold sweats

○ Discomfort in the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach

○ Unusual fatigue

2. When Additional Help is Needed: Here are some ways to know when your parent may need to start receiving additional assistance in their older age:

○ Exhibiting poor judgement

○ Repeating themselves often

○ Forgetting the current month or year

○ Difficulty managing their finances

○ Home is dangerous to them perhaps they have recently fallen or hurt themselves.

○ Problem remember appointments, commitments or other lapses of memory.

3. Where to Live: Should the decision be made that your parent is no longer able to care for themselves, it is important to already have established where they would like to live. They could live at home with home care services, as listed below, with a family member who will care for them or in senior citizen homes where they can be cared for.

4. Home Care Services: Whether in their own home or in the home of a family member, your parents can receive home care services if they do not wish to live in a nursing home. A home care center, such as this one, can offer skilled nursing care, infusion therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy. This can alleviate pressure and stress as you all professionals to help care for your parent.

Supporting hand from kind doctor for the elderly woman.

Supporting hand from kind doctor for the elderly woman.

5. All Legal Matters in Order : Establish durable power of attorney. This gives someone else the ability to act on their behalf in case of mental or physical incapacitation. This can range anywhere from health care decisions to financial decisions.

6. Finances in Order: This may include a will or a living trust. A will allocates money and possessions to those listed. A living trust gives someone else the ability to make financial decisions involving assets in case of death or incapacitation.

7. End of Life Wishes: Would they like to be kept on a feeding tube and ventilator if they are in an irreversible coma? Should CPR be done on them should they stop breathing and their heart stops? Are any of these decisions affected by the presence of a terminal illness?

8. Funeral Arrangements: Though this is something we do not like to think about, at some point it will be necessary to plan their funeral. Talk with them about what their wishes are as far as what is involved, who they would like to speak and how they would like it to be done. Some prefer a celebration of life rather than a mourning, while others prefer a more somber occasion. It is also good to know if there are any funds being saved to cover these often high costs.

9. Understanding of Medicine and Treatments: If they regularly visit the doctor or are taking medications for any reason, it is a good idea to have someone else aware of these things. It is also good to make sure your parent understands why they are being given these medications and treatments.

10. Spend Quality Time: As you watch your parents age, you likely become more and more aware of the time that is slipping away. Be sure to spending quality time with your parents, as much as possible. Ask them questions about their life, record their thoughts and wisdom and deepen your relationship with them. Often, elderly people feel lonely, as everyone’s lives progress. Make sure they still feel wanted and valued. By having these conversations and knowing how to best address these topics, you will help make it possible to more fully enjoy your parents as they age, confident that you can help care for them and their wishes are being fulfilled.Nonna e nipote

Guest post by author Alyssa Craig.

I love finding new ways to enjoy Salmon. Usually we cook it on the grill but in this recipe the salmon cooks in the oven. I adapted this recipe from a recipe I found on Taste of Home. The salmon can be prepared ahead which makes it a perfect dish to serve for company. You can prepare the salmon and then refrigerate until ready to put in the oven.

Nut Crusted Salmon

1 pound of fresh baby spinach
1 ½ pounds of salmon
1 tsp. olive oil
3 Tbsp. honey
3 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
¼ cup panko breadcrumbs
2 Tbsp. sliced almonds
2 Tbsp. chopped pecans
¼ cup mayonnaise

Place the spinach in a 13 x 9 inch baking dish that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Top with the salmon. Drizzle oil over the spinach.

Combine honey and mustard. Remove 2 Tbsp. of the mixture and brush over the salmon. Place the panko crumbs, almonds and pecans in a small food processor; cover and process until ground. Press onto the salmon.

Salmon ready for the oven

Salmon ready for the oven

Stir mayonnaise into the remaining honey mixture. Refrigerate until serving.

Bake the salmon, uncovered, at 450 for 18-22 minutes or until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

Nut crusted salmon

Nut crusted salmon

Drizzle with the reserved sauce. Serve with brown rice. Makes about 6 servings.

Nut crusted salmon

Nut crusted salmon

Side note: Remember that sauce I made with the extra honey-mustard? Well I made it, put it in the refrigerator to chill and did’t think of it again until after we finished the salmon… The salmon was very good but I’ve tried it with the sauce and it was even better!

 

    Welcome to

Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop #15!

Where has the summer gone? I can’t believe it’s September! We have a busy Labor Day weekend ahead. Lots of friends and family visiting! It’s always a fun way to end the summer! It feels like summer although if you look at the hillsides you can already see the leaves are no longer that vibrant green.

Vermont hillside

Vermont hillside

I hope you join us this week for Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop! Thank you for sharing your homesteading, homemaking, and homeschooling posts with us each week! It’s so much fun to read your hints, tips, and happenings! Each week I will feature our most visited post from the week before, which also linked back to the hop, and my weekly favorite. I hope you have fun exploring all the great ideas everyone has shared with us!

We would love to have you follow us on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Etsy, Google+, Instagram or by email

Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop Hosts are:
Tracy @ Our Simple Life
Sandra @ Clearwater Farm,
Kathi @ Oak Hill Homestead,
Amy & Kristi Home & Farm Sense 
and Me! (NancyNancy On The Home Front)

(Remember – If you would like to be featured, be sure to link back to the hop otherwise you will not be featured!)

The most clicked on post last week:
Is Homesteading Like Prepping? Written by Billy over at The Homesteading Hippy.is-homesteading-like-prepping-small

My featured post:
Garden Fresh Salsa written by Lori Leigh over at LL Farm.salsa made with red and yellow tomatoes

 

Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week! If you were featured, grab the button to display proudly on your blog!

Please follow these simple rules!
  • Family friendly posts only!
  • No links to blog hops or posts dedicated to advertising products.
  • Please share posts that you haven’t linked up previously to keep the hop fresh.
  • Please visit other bloggers and let them know you found them here!
  • If you wish to be featured, you must link back to the hop (on any host’s blog… in your post, side bar, or blog hop page) with the button or a text link!
  • Please follow us by email! You’ll receive notice when the hop is open for business.
  • Only share content and photos that you have created or have permission to share.
  • By linking to this hop you are giving us permission to link back to your post and share one photo if you are featured.
  • No giveaways please!
  • Please note: Posts that don’t follow these few little guidelines will be deleted!
  If you were featured be sure to pick up your, “Our Simple Homestead” button. We look forward to seeing what you have to share this week!  If you would like to be featured in the future, be sure to link back to the hop. We love to read encouraging posts about homesteading. Please stop by to congratulate the featured bloggers this week. If you were featured, grab a button to display proudly on your blog.

Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop

 

Let’s start hopping!


Can you believe it’s September already? Not sure where the time is going but it sure is flying by quickly. As I look around the colors are already changing in the hillsides. The leaves no longer have that vibrant green color, instead they have a more olive hue.

Vermont hillsides

Vermont hillsides

Much as I love summer I actually look forward to autumn when the days are still warm but the nights are chilly. The garden is winding down, I have cleared some of the beds, getting ready to plant a cover crop and get my garlic planted for next season.

Empty raised beds

Empty raised beds

Looks like I’ll have a good crop of Brussel sprouts this year.

Brussel sprouts

Brussel sprouts

There are a few little New England Pie Pumpkins in the garden.

Pie Pumpkins

Pie Pumpkins

Remember that large pile of wood?wood My husband has managed to get it all cut up!

Progress on the wood pile!

Progress on the wood pile!

Now to do a little splitting. Then to finish the stacking, the end is in sight!

All stacked and ready for winter!

All stacked and ready for winter!

Always a good feeling to have a good supply of wood! Looking forward to Labor Day weekend. We always have a group of friends come for the weekend. It’s a good time to reconnect and just enjoy a relaxing weekend!

Looking forward to a relaxing weekend!

Looking forward to a relaxing weekend!

Linked to some of my favorite blog hops, see link in right side bar. Also linked to:
Wildcrafting

I’ve mentioned that we have blueberries in abundance this year!Blueberries The freezer is full of frozen blueberries; the pantry is well stocked with Blueberry Lime Jam, Blueberry Lemon Bread, Blueberry Vinegar and Blueberry Muffins! Still we have blueberries. So I decided to make some Blueberry Vinaigrette. It’s very easy to make and only has a few ingredients.

Blueberry Vinaigrette

½ cup of fresh blueberries
¼ cup white wine vinegar
¼ cup honey

Combine all the ingredients in your blender or food processor.Place ingredients in a blender. Blend until smooth. Blend until smooth.Strain if you’d like to get rid of the little bits of blueberry skin. This step is optional. Refrigerate until ready to use.Strain. It’s that easy. Delicious on a salad. It went over very well with our company!

Salad with Blueberry Vinaigrette

Salad with Blueberry Vinaigrette

Linked to many of my favorite blog hops, see link on right side bar. Also linked to:
”Wildcrafting

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